theplanetofsound:
How to make a CD cover from a single A4 paper
And of course you can decorate it if you want. Or you can decide to print
something on it and then turn it into a cover.
via

theplanetofsound:

How to make a CD cover from a single A4 paper

And of course you can decorate it if you want. Or you can decide to print

something on it and then turn it into a cover.

via

robbiebrantley:

Jackie Kennedy…

his idea was something i always wanted to do and am STILL trying to pull off

unbelievable sounds. unreal performance.

I actually have one of his CD’s from when he still preformed under the alias “Jackie Kennedy”. Now he preforms under the name Dylan Tietze. Click on the link if you want to check out his band camp page. Also, here’s his Tumblr.

gentleswastika:

Damn straight.

gentleswastika:

Damn straight.

killedincars:

Yellow Swans - Going Places (Type, 2010)
Another year, another Yellow Swans release; did this duo not break up? Indeed they did almost two years ago, but splits-ville came and went, as did two 2009 releases, and now finally Going Places. Throughout the last decade, Pete Swanson and Gabriel Mindel Saloman have attracted an army (by noise standards) of devoted fans, many of which secretly wish this Type release was not the group’s swan song. Well I am here to say this is it (or is it?…) and everything will be alright; maybe this is a good thing?“Malarky!” you cry, “I thought one of the first axioms of choice theory was that more is better?” Okay, you got me. I am probably just rationalizing this situation, trying to come to terms with it in my own way. However, I could not imagine a better bookend to the Swans’ career than Going Places. Instead of continuing the ballistic speed of five CD-Rs a year, with this album Swanson and Saloman hit one last home-run in a catalog already littered with gems, opting to be Sandy Koufax instead of Brett Favre.Oh right, what does Going Places sound like? Those who have played At All Ends and Deterioration to death already have the basic picture. With this release, the Swans focus on the droning side of their sound, throwing in some lush swells and hints of crackling noise for good measure. But Going Places is far from a genre exercise or a linear progression from the duo’s recent output. No, it is an extraordinarily meticulous release, further developing the soundscapes explored on records past. Maybe partly due to a less hectic schedule, songs like ‘Opt Out’ breathe in ways I have seldom heard from the Yellow Swans. Awash in the feedback there is a subtle pulse to this record, wherein a majority of the 45 minute duration is underscored by a minimal, down-tempo beat. Gone are the days of schizophrenic rhythm found in Dreamed or even the slow evolving backbone of Psychic Secession.Through these elements, the Swans pull the listener in for an intimate experience, exhuming Swanson and Saloman’s deepest emotions for this almost decade long project and leaving it all to bare. Far from merely self-indulgent, Going Places can serve as a catharsis for their fans — as I previously mentioned, serving as a medium for acceptance. Equally as important, Going Places is one of the best records the Swans have released and is the best new noise album I have heard in a good while.
R.I.P.

killedincars:

Yellow Swans - Going Places (Type, 2010)


Another year, another Yellow Swans release; did this duo not break up? Indeed they did almost two years ago, but splits-ville came and went, as did two 2009 releases, and now finally Going Places. Throughout the last decade, Pete Swanson and Gabriel Mindel Saloman have attracted an army (by noise standards) of devoted fans, many of which secretly wish this Type release was not the group’s swan song. Well I am here to say this is it (or is it?…) and everything will be alright; maybe this is a good thing?

“Malarky!” you cry, “I thought one of the first axioms of choice theory was that more is better?” Okay, you got me. I am probably just rationalizing this situation, trying to come to terms with it in my own way. However, I could not imagine a better bookend to the Swans’ career than Going Places. Instead of continuing the ballistic speed of five CD-Rs a year, with this album Swanson and Saloman hit one last home-run in a catalog already littered with gems, opting to be Sandy Koufax instead of Brett Favre.

Oh right, what does Going Places sound like? Those who have played At All Ends and Deterioration to death already have the basic picture. With this release, the Swans focus on the droning side of their sound, throwing in some lush swells and hints of crackling noise for good measure. But Going Places is far from a genre exercise or a linear progression from the duo’s recent output. No, it is an extraordinarily meticulous release, further developing the soundscapes explored on records past. Maybe partly due to a less hectic schedule, songs like ‘Opt Out’ breathe in ways I have seldom heard from the Yellow Swans. Awash in the feedback there is a subtle pulse to this record, wherein a majority of the 45 minute duration is underscored by a minimal, down-tempo beat. Gone are the days of schizophrenic rhythm found in Dreamed or even the slow evolving backbone of Psychic Secession.

Through these elements, the Swans pull the listener in for an intimate experience, exhuming Swanson and Saloman’s deepest emotions for this almost decade long project and leaving it all to bare. Far from merely self-indulgent, Going Places can serve as a catharsis for their fans — as I previously mentioned, serving as a medium for acceptance. Equally as important, Going Places is one of the best records the Swans have released and is the best new noise album I have heard in a good while.

R.I.P.